Thursday, 26 January 2017

Journey Code

In the move from a Waterfall approach to a more Agile way of working we need to learn to be more comfortable with our software being in a less well defined state. It’s not any less correct per-se, it’s just that we may choose to prioritise our work differently now so that we tackle the higher value features first.

Destination Unknown

A consequence of this approach is that conversations between, say, traditional architects (who are talking about the system as they expect it to end up) and those developing it (who know it’s only somewhere between started and one possible future), need interpretation. Our job as programmers is to break these big features down into much smaller units that can be (ideally) independently scoped and prioritised. Being agile is about adapting to changing requirements and that’s impossible if every feature needs to designed, delivered and tested in it’s entirely.

In an attempt to bridge these two perspectives I’ve somewhat turned into a broken record by frequently saying “but that’s the destination, we only need to start the journey” [1]. This is very much a statement to remind our (often old and habitual) selves that we don’t build software like that anymore.

Build the Right Thing

The knock on effect is that any given feature is likely only partially implemented, especially in the early days when what we are still trying to explore what it is we’re actually trying to build in the first place. For example, data validation is feature we want in the product before going live, but we can probably make do with only touching on the subject lightly whilst we explore what data even needs validating in the first place.

This partially implemented feature has started to go by the name “journey code”. While you can argue that all code is essentially malleable as the system grows from its birth to its eventual demise, what we are really trying to convey here is code which cannot really be described as having been “designed”. As such it does not indicate in any meaningful way the thoughts and intended direction of the original author – they literally did the simplest possible thing to make the acceptance test pass and that’s all.

Destination in Sight

When we finally come to play out the more detailed aspects of the feature that becomes the time at which we intend to replace what we did along the journey with where we think the destination really is. Journey code does not even have to have been written in response to the feature itself, it may just be some infrastructure code required to bootstrap exploring a different one, such as logging or persistence.

What it does mean is that collaboration is even more essential when the story is eventually picked up for fleshing out to ensure that we are not wasting time trying to fit in with some design that never existed in the first place. Unless you are someone who happily ignores whatever code anyone else ever writes anyway, and they do exist, you will no doubt spend at least some time trying to understand what’s gone before you. Hence being able to just say “journey code” has become a nice shorthand for “it wasn’t designed so feel free to chuck it away and do the right thing now we know what really needs doing”.


[1] I covered a different side-effect of this waterfall/agile impedance mismatch in “Confusion Over Waste”.

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